The New Yorker

How Do We Change America?

A powerful essay that poses the question “How do we change America?”, looks to the past and finds a repetitive cycle of calls for reform much like those being put forward by many politicians now, followed by policy making and implementation failures. The author proposes that, in the end, “We cannot insist on “real change” in the United States by continuing to use the same methods, arguments, and failed political strategies that have brought us to this moment.”

Color and Light

It’s a safe bet that anyone who enjoyed reading Sally Rooney’s novels, or is enjoying watching the BBC adaptation of Normal People, will enjoy this short story.

Living Through the Blitz

One from the New Yorker’s archive, this brief September 1940 dispatch from London describes life during the blitz and marvels at the “cheerfulness and fortitude with which ordinary individuals are doing their jobs under nerve-racking conditions.”

Snow Science Against the Avalanche

An insight into specialist avalanche mitigation teams and the challenges they face working with a natural material that is “light and fluffy and soft and downy, and it’s everybody’s favorite thing in the world” but also “one of the most destructive forces in nature”.